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Cayangan Lake, Coron - Palawan

Less Is More

Slugging a camera around their neck like that part of their body can easily snap just because of the sheer weight of the image capturing device, that was then and this is now. I for one would not go on a 10 day expedition up in the mountains bringing gear that weighs more than my essentials. The technology that exists today is an upgrade to both the craft and to the photographer who is seeking out that picture perfect moment. DLSRs are slowly becoming a thing of the past. And yes, for the record all of you can quote me on that one. As a photographer who started with DSLRs, I haven’t looked back ever since when I made the jump to this system. With the introduction of cameras without a mirror inside the body, things got “lighter” so to speak. I can now easily travel, shoot and enjoy my job without the painstaking weight and hassle of a large camera. With the past few years, different brands have made improvements to their own systems but what stood out for me were the Sony cameras. This article is not in any way paid for or by the brand, this is my own personal opinion based on first-hand actual experience.

Kaamulan Datu, Bukidnon

 

You name it: megapixel count, focusing speed, 20 frames per second bursts, full frame sensors, 4k videos, ISOs that reach almost 500k, solid glass/lenses for every need in your photographic genre and the ease of just charging your camera through a power bank or your laptop. Sony has developed their technology way beyond any brand that is present now. Honestly, I have tried different brands, camera models and they all have pros and cons. But as a travel photographer who tries to capture that moment in front of me, I prefer to have a camera that gets that moment as accurate as possible. Do take note that I would like to emphasize the words “accurate as possible” and not brilliantly saturated to the point that expectation versus reality becomes an issue to the tourists who might visit the place that I just photographed.

 

Coron, Palawan

 

I’ve been documenting festivals for the past 4 years in my career and the best shots that I’ve ever taken were with my a6000. It does justice to the speed of the dancers and the emotions that they give off during the performance. My best experience with it is when I shoot with an 85mm prime and the early morning light just touches the face of the subject, it gives off the best rendering of shadows and highlights in an image I have ever seen. Recently, I got to use a Sony a7 to a trip in Coron, Palawan. It was astounding how it could hold its own in both the heat and the bad weather which I was graciously given when I was there. In time, DSLR users will know what it’s like to have mirrorless system. Deny it or run from it, the technology is already here. As far as I’m concerned, it’s the only mirrorless camera brand you see in the Olympics.

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About Glenn Palacio

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